Pollokshields Heritage Heritage Trail Two 
James Miller (1860-1947)

James Miller (1860-1947) 

Responsible for Dunholme, Ardtornish.

James Miller was a prominent Glasgow architect whose career spanned over fifty years. Born in Auchtergaven, Perthshire in 1860 he was educated at Perth Academy. In 1877 he became apprenticed to local architect Andrew Heiton afterwards spending some time under the tutelage of Hippolyte Jean Blanc before joining the Caledonian Railway in Perth. In 1888 however he was transferred to Glasgow where he designed a number of stations under the supervision of the chief engineer George Graham. During this period he set up a small up-market private practice and in 1892 took up full time practice when he won the competition for Belmont Parish Church in Hillhead. His contacts in the Caledonian Railway resulted in him being awarded most of the major station contracts including Kelvingrove Railway Station, St Enoch’s Subway Station, and the extension of Glasgow Central Station Hotel.

In 1898 he won the competition for the 1901 Glasgow International Exhibition in Kelvingrove and in 1901 he was awarded the commission for the new Glasgow Royal Infirmary although assessor Sir Robert Rowand Anderson had recommended Henry Edward Clifford. From 1898 onwards there is an increasing American influence to his work although his public and commercial work remained Glasgow neo-Baroque in style. He was joined in business by his son George Miller in c.1936 but the partnership ended with George’s untimely death in 1940. James Miller himself retired in December 1940. A contemporary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, James Miller was a prolific and successful architect but never achieved the same lasting reputation as Mackintosh. James Miller died at Randolphfield, Stirling on 28 November 1947. He is best remembered for his designs for the Turnberry Hotel, Gleneagles Hotel and numerous Arts and Crafts villas throughout Scotland.